ePortfolios in Your Classroom: Results & Analysis

Results & Analysis of the ePortfolio experience of Educators around the world. The ePortfolios in Your Classroom survey contains current information about the actual application and integration of ePortfolios in our Schools.

Thank you all for your time and contributions. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. I hope that this data may help you understand the journey that your fellow practitioners are joining us on. We are all moving in different stages of development and have different circumstances; but I feel strongly that  we are better when we learn together.

You can find the presentation below at DODH ePortfolio Survey Results

Bringing Infographics to Life

2ag Kelso's Choice WheelGrade Two students are able readers, but it is developmentally appropriate for them to be reading leveled picture books as all of my students are developing reading and writing skills. Additionally, in my classroom we have several Learning Support and English as an Additional Language students.  When the message is not clear, the pictures spur conversation and allow the class to debate what the text might mean. By using this infographic in small group sessions, students and teachers are able to discuss concepts, record ideas for implementation and share examples of their practice.

Understanding the Inquiry Cycle

We are an International Baccalaureate (IB) Primary Years Programme (PYP) school and have a framework which supports our curriculum, guiding our students in their learning journey. We call this the Inquiry Cycle. The PYP is an inquiry based program  where students lead their learning by following a series of steps: Tuning In, Finding Out, Sorting Out, Going Further, Making Conclusions and Taking Action. This model, based on the work of Kathy Short can be quite complicated for young learners and often uses vocabulary which is advanced for their age. By translating the inquiry cycle into an infographic, the students are able to make connections between the theory and their own learning.

inquiry_cycle

Kathy Short’s Inquiry Cycle is a cornerstone of PYP pedagogy and practice

In 2ag, we use the infographic below repeatedly throughout the year. Our knowledge builds in stages as we work our way through our 6 units of inquiry using the cycle each time. At the beginning of the year, students examine each section in  conjunction with what is happening in class. We focused on asking questions in our Communication Systems unit. The students asked teachers and students in our school about how we use systems to communicate information to the different elements of the school community. Students use the infographic to create their own definitions for the “Ask” stage and create their own image to accompany their definition. As we progress through the year, we revisit our definitions building a collaborative class definition which we will turn into an Inquiry Cycle class display. By giving ownership of the definition and the image, it makes the learning relevant and accessible to the students. Unfortunately, as it is so early in the school year, I do not yet have a display built for this class. I will begin to develop it with my Second Grade class after the Winter break in our third unit.

Infographics in Action

A good example of how this process works with an infographic is our class created version of the Kelso’s Choice Wheel. Kelso’s Choices are a system of problem solving strategies for students to manage peer conflict and behaviour on the playground and within the classroom. Our students work with the School Counselor and each other to understand the programme’s elements and how they can make good choices in different situations. We shared our 3D infographic with the Primary School during our class assembly and the Kelso’s Choice Wheel which my students created in on this post. The text which supports each section is on the back of each pie piece as they held them up during the presentation and read it out to the audience. The class composition has now been hung up in the hallway outside of our classroom, to help educate the rest of the school and remind them of the positive choices they can make when interacting with their friends.

thecycleofinquirybasedlearning

IBLibrary.com’s inquiry infographic which 2ag annotate throughout the year.

 

 

Border crossing

Universal Borderless Patrol

Border crossing

Border crossing: South Tyrol – Switzerland. 2295m above sea level by Gerhard Haindl

Wouldn’t that be an interesting occupation? Flipping the concept of independent nations on its head; the Universal Borderless Patrol would have the fortuity to interact with all nations, races and peoples that inhabit our planet. The role would extend beyond our planet, through our Solar System and out into the expanse of the Universe. The idea matches the scope of our access to content and information; the edges of our technological universe. The internet is oblivious to the limitations of physical borders. Our globe is literally banded together, regardless of the location or distance. Communities are now closer than ever, with the invaluable ability to make connections with like-minded people or access shared content from your pocket instantly. Physical space has been eliminated by the technological revolution and barriers between individuals, information and media no longer exist. In rare, but high-profile cases, access to information is restricted or denied; however, I have not yet had the opportunity to visit, teach or live in these countries. Most countries in Europe and North America, where I have lived; all subscribe to their own, as well as international copyright law. Regulations, penalties and acceptable use guidelines may slightly differ, but the core principles are the same. Youth is the key. Educate the youth. They will be in positions of power one day.  

Privatgrund

Digital Citizenship should help to eliminate the need to keep content restricted by helping the user cite their sources properly. Image by Unci Narynin

As educators, our obligation is to promote the ideals and guidelines of digital citizenship; protecting the rights of creators while balancing the needs of users. Teaching these responsibilities is easy, as students are keen and there are many excellent digital citizenship programs available.  We use both Common Sense Media and the ISTE Standards at our school. We also have a Scope and Sequence of Skills created in conjunction with the International Baccalaureate, which forms the backbone of our technological education as a school. We have a strong digital citizenship policy, which is communicated through school wide planning and sequential learning objectives, activities and resources targeting different grade levels.  The programme culminates in our Computer Code of Conduct, which is included in the package of information sent to all Parents and Students at the beginning of the year. Both parties sign the agreement and the notarized copy goes into the Student’s Portfolio. The Computer Code of Conduct is further posted in classrooms and included in the Student’s agendas.

No Borders

The internet is bounded by no geographical barriers as evidenced in the photo “No Borders” by Michael Q Todd

The School Librarian is a key cog, discussing the theory behind digital citizenship and reinforcing appropriate searching, referencing and citation skills. From Grade 5 onwards, our students are expected to have accurate bibliographies in all assignments.  Our Primary Technology Integrationist works closely with each grade level at the beginning of the year to help students understand the purpose and importance Digital Citizenship. She works in collaboration with the Students to create essential agreements within the classroom.  Our Director of eLearning leads in-depth sessions for all members of our community, providing leadership needed to address a variety of aspects of the online world. The Communications Department publishes our technology philosophy on the website and in the school promotional publications. It is a tapestry, interwoven with many people sharing a consistent message to create the full picture.

The front line in establishing the respect for copyright, is always the educational leadership that a class teacher demonstrates everyday. Modeling good practice and stressing the importance of proper use is essential at all levels. Instilling good habits and nurturing development year-on-year builds confidence, competence and understanding within the user. We must always be cognizant that we are building future generations who need to be well versed in the international expectations of copyright, communications and media.