ePortfolios in Your Classroom: Results & Analysis

Results & Analysis of the ePortfolio experience of Educators around the world. The ePortfolios in Your Classroom survey contains current information about the actual application and integration of ePortfolios in our Schools.

Thank you all for your time and contributions. Your feedback is greatly appreciated. I hope that this data may help you understand the journey that your fellow practitioners are joining us on. We are all moving in different stages of development and have different circumstances; but I feel strongly that  we are better when we learn together.

You can find the presentation below at DODH ePortfolio Survey Results

The Game is Afoot

hour_of_code_certificateWhen it comes to game-based learning in  an educational context it is tough to beat the Hour of Code. A worldwide initiative, specifically targeted at teaching children through play, how to program a computer is the first stop in quality game based learning. A significant effort is being made, by many invested parties, to address the future gap in technology skills. Tasks are scaffolded from the very beginning, with dragging and organizing blocks of colour; all the way to creating animations and proper coding challenges. Activities are interesting and educationally solid. Students lead their own learning through multiple stages and disciplines. Hour of Code captures their imagination and inspires them in new ways. While engaging with the program, they are applying mathematical, language and thinking skills.

Other opportunities which extend game-based learning include the use of Makey Makey  and student coders graduating to the use of the Probot roamers. Makey Makey calls itself an “invention kit for the 21st century. Turn everyday objects into touchpads through art, engineering, and everything in between”.  The Probot roamer allows the user to program directional instructions for the robots to follow. The roamer might follow a track by receiving instructions such as following or creating the outline of shapes, to demonstrate cardinal directions and ordinal numbers.A strong educational tool, game based learning has many powerful attributes to develop student understanding. It fosters a sense of ownership and identity which in turn creates positive self esteem. Giving students challenges which they can address in a fun and relaxing manner is always a winning situation. There is a growing pool of resources but spreading these types of activities across the curriculum continues to be our next frontier.makey_makeyprobot350

The Responsible Use of Technology (RUA)

E&A Publishing House bring you the 3 Keys to the Responsible Use of Technology!

Responsible Use Agreement perfectly suited to Primary & Middle School Students

E&A’s Responsible Use Agreement is perfectly suited to Primary & Middle School Students

 

Infographic for a Responsible Use Agreement (RUA)

Co-Authors: Eric Richards from the excellent blog E=ed2 & Andrew Grover of Digging Out of a Digital Hole

Target audience: Grade 5 Students

Wider use: Upper Primary & Middle School Students

CoETaIL Course 2 Final Project

 

Improvements in version 4.2: 

Initially, a more complex RUA infographic which contained 10 separate themes without a unifying thread. Now three themes, paralleled with educational origami’s Acceptable Use Agreement (AUA). Students will be better able to remember and apply these codes of conduct. Covers all major areas and aspects of Digital Citizenship for ages 7-16. KISS rule leads to wider acceptance, understanding and adoption of the principles within Staff and Students. Comprehensive and shared understandings are scaffolded for success no matter where on the continuum. Licenced by Creative Commons.

 

Feedback from users:

“strikes a balance between the needs at opposite ends of the spectrum.”  Teacher

“implementation plan ensures major strands build upon each other”. PYP Coordinator

“Students & Staff start the year on a solid digital footing.” Director of e-Learning

“a simple glance reinforces the central ideas of the RUA”. Grade 5 Student

 

Implementation Plan included!

Lesson plans adhere to 3 overarching concepts:

  1. Look after Yourself – You are important.
  2. Look After Others – Show you care.
  3. Look After Property – Caring for your own & other’s property requires thought & effort.


Download your copy of 3 Keys to the Responsible Use of Technology!

 

 

Border crossing

Universal Borderless Patrol

Border crossing

Border crossing: South Tyrol – Switzerland. 2295m above sea level by Gerhard Haindl

Wouldn’t that be an interesting occupation? Flipping the concept of independent nations on its head; the Universal Borderless Patrol would have the fortuity to interact with all nations, races and peoples that inhabit our planet. The role would extend beyond our planet, through our Solar System and out into the expanse of the Universe. The idea matches the scope of our access to content and information; the edges of our technological universe. The internet is oblivious to the limitations of physical borders. Our globe is literally banded together, regardless of the location or distance. Communities are now closer than ever, with the invaluable ability to make connections with like-minded people or access shared content from your pocket instantly. Physical space has been eliminated by the technological revolution and barriers between individuals, information and media no longer exist. In rare, but high-profile cases, access to information is restricted or denied; however, I have not yet had the opportunity to visit, teach or live in these countries. Most countries in Europe and North America, where I have lived; all subscribe to their own, as well as international copyright law. Regulations, penalties and acceptable use guidelines may slightly differ, but the core principles are the same. Youth is the key. Educate the youth. They will be in positions of power one day.  

Privatgrund

Digital Citizenship should help to eliminate the need to keep content restricted by helping the user cite their sources properly. Image by Unci Narynin

As educators, our obligation is to promote the ideals and guidelines of digital citizenship; protecting the rights of creators while balancing the needs of users. Teaching these responsibilities is easy, as students are keen and there are many excellent digital citizenship programs available.  We use both Common Sense Media and the ISTE Standards at our school. We also have a Scope and Sequence of Skills created in conjunction with the International Baccalaureate, which forms the backbone of our technological education as a school. We have a strong digital citizenship policy, which is communicated through school wide planning and sequential learning objectives, activities and resources targeting different grade levels.  The programme culminates in our Computer Code of Conduct, which is included in the package of information sent to all Parents and Students at the beginning of the year. Both parties sign the agreement and the notarized copy goes into the Student’s Portfolio. The Computer Code of Conduct is further posted in classrooms and included in the Student’s agendas.

No Borders

The internet is bounded by no geographical barriers as evidenced in the photo “No Borders” by Michael Q Todd

The School Librarian is a key cog, discussing the theory behind digital citizenship and reinforcing appropriate searching, referencing and citation skills. From Grade 5 onwards, our students are expected to have accurate bibliographies in all assignments.  Our Primary Technology Integrationist works closely with each grade level at the beginning of the year to help students understand the purpose and importance Digital Citizenship. She works in collaboration with the Students to create essential agreements within the classroom.  Our Director of eLearning leads in-depth sessions for all members of our community, providing leadership needed to address a variety of aspects of the online world. The Communications Department publishes our technology philosophy on the website and in the school promotional publications. It is a tapestry, interwoven with many people sharing a consistent message to create the full picture.

The front line in establishing the respect for copyright, is always the educational leadership that a class teacher demonstrates everyday. Modeling good practice and stressing the importance of proper use is essential at all levels. Instilling good habits and nurturing development year-on-year builds confidence, competence and understanding within the user. We must always be cognizant that we are building future generations who need to be well versed in the international expectations of copyright, communications and media.